About Bruises

A bruise occurs when blood becomes trapped under the skin and the skin appears blue to reddish purple due to the release of iron from red blood cells. Lactoferrin molecules are released by our body to the bruised area and binds to this iron, which is then broken down by our immune system.

About Bruise-eze®

Bruise-eze® contains lactoferrin embedded in a liposome. It speeds up the healing process of bruises allowing them to disappear faster1.

Using a patented lipid technology, nanolipids (lipid micelles) are formulated and used as an innovative drug delivery system for lactoferrin. The structure of these liposomes closely resembles that of cell membranes and guarantees stability by protecting the lactoferrin from degradation. It also enhances solubility, which means that more lactoferrin is absorbed into the skin.

Action of liposomal lactoferrin:

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Binds iron ions to protect against its harmful effects.
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It has antimicrobial properties (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal and antiparasitic).
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It helps to improve the appearance of skin lesions.
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It has anti-inflammatory properties.
Always read the label before purchase. If symptoms worsen or change unexpectedly, talk to your healthcare professional. Follow directions for use.

Bruise-eze® speeds up the headline process of bruises

Because lactoferrin has a very strong affinity for iron, in one study it was shown to reduce severe bruising (hematoma) discolouration by 31.5% after applying liposomal lactoferrin to the wound site for 1 week compared to 11.1% without application of liposomal lactoferrin1.

1. Martinez Grau, G., Lopez, M., Gomez, MC. (Dept. of Orbital & Ocular Plastics, Brill Pharma, S.L.)Use of Liposomal Lactoferrin in Post-Blepharoplasty Hematoma. In: XXIX SECPOO (Spanish Society of Ocular and Orbital Plastic Surgeons) Congress; 5-7 June 2019; Barcelona.

Always read the label before purchase. If symptoms worsen or change unexpectedly, talk to your healthcare professional. Follow directions for use.

Products

Bruise-eze is a topical therapy to reduce bruises, hematomas and hemosiderinic dyschromias in recovering, trophic or dyschromic skin.

European version:
Kelador® (Brill Pharma, Spain)
Keladerm® (Solinea, Poland)
Kelairon® (Piam, Italy)
Kelapher® (PharmGen, Czech Republic)

Always read the label before purchase. If symptoms worsen or change unexpectedly, talk to your healthcare professional. Follow directions for use.

FAQS

What is Bruise-eze® used for?

Bruise-eze® Cream and Bruise-eze® Airless

These products are intended for the treatment of alterations of the dermal-epidermal tissue, such as,

  • Bruises
  • Haematomas
  • Skin discolouration resulting from: bruises, haematomas, ecchymosis, post-operative bruising
  • Post sclerotherapy haemosiderinic dyschromia (Hyperpigmentation after varicose vein injections)
  • CVI (Chronic Venous Insufficiency) dyschromia (skin discolouration due to pooling of blood in the veins caused by poorly working veins or valves)
  • Prevention of iron-dependent venous ulcers
  • Post non-ablative laser treatment, such as epilation and vascular lasers

Bruise-eze® 2.B

This product is a sterile, single-use applicator (5 per box) intended for topical management of deep secondary-healing wounds and is particularly for indications, such as,

  • Pressure sores
  • Deep leg ulcers
  • Cavity wounds
  • Excisions
  • Post-operative wound dehiscence (splitting)
  • Light burns
  • Abrasions
  • Fissures
  • Scarring of wounds
  • Post-ablative laser treatments

It is also suitable for the applications listed for Bruise-eze® Cream and Airless products.

Why is it worth using Bruise-eze® cream?

  • Reduces redness and lightens discoloration of the skin associated with the accumulation of iron
  • Effectively improves the appearance and condition of the skin
  • Reduces the inflammatory reaction
  • The liposomal form of lactoferrin ensures that more lactoferrin reaches the area it is needed most and can start working faster.

What are the active ingredients?

Lactoferrin (lipid technology)

How to use Bruise-eze®?

External use only. Apply twice a day topically on the affected area of the skin

When not to use Bruise-eze®?

Known hypersensitivity to components.

Before you use Bruise-eze®

  • Do not use if hypersensitive to active ingredient or excipients of Bruise-eze
  • Keep out of reach of children
  • Do not swallow
  • Do not use Bruise-eze if the packaging does not appear intact
  • Do not use after the expiry date

Precautions for use

  • Consult a doctor before use if pregnant or lactating and in children (under 3 years)
  • Do not use Bruise-eze® on open wounds
  • Prolonged use of Bruise-eze® could lead to sensitisation
  • Simultaneous use of creams and/or similar on the same anatomical part may preclude the efficacy and the safety of Bruise-eze®

How is Bruise-eze® stored?

Store the package at temperature not exceeding 25°C in a dry place away from light and heat sources

Where can I buy Bruise-eze®?

The Bruise-eze® range of products is available from the following stockists. If your local pharmacy is not listed, please contact us or ask your pharmacy to contact us.

Customcare Compounding Pharmacy
644 Old Northern Rd
Dural NSW 2158 Australia
Tel: + 61 2 9651 3547 F: + 61 2 9651 5293
M: +61 420 686 168
Email: info@customcarepharmacy.com.au

Customcare Compounding Pharmacy
284 Wattletree Road
Malvern East VIC 3145
Tel: 03 9509 2157 F: 03 9509 5760
Email: vic@customcarepharmacy.com.au

Customcare Compounding Pharmacy
392 Henley Beach Rd,
Lockleys SA 5032
Tel: 08 8443 5639 Fax: 08 8354 3589
Email: sa@customcarepharmacy.com.au

Cincotta Discount Chemist (Rhodes)
Shop G30, Rhodes Central Shopping Centre,
6-14 Walker Street,

Rhodes NSW 2138
Tel: 9189 9788 Fax: 9189 9877
Email: r.rhodes@cincottadc.com.au

Cincotta Discount Chemist (Rouse Hill)
Shop GR085 Rouse Hill Town Centre
10-14 Market Lane,
Rouse Hill NSW 2155
T: 8882 9033

Soul Pattinson Chemist (Rouse Hill) 
Rouse Hill Village Centre, Shop 8
18-24 Adelphi Street,
Rouse Hill NSW 2155
Tel: 9629 4079

The Entrance District After Hours Pharmacy
112 Wyong Road,
Killarney NSW 2261
Tel: 02 4332 3424

Kenthurst Pharmacy
Shop 5A, 4 Nelson St,
Kenthurst NSW 2156
Tel: 02 9654 1984

Galston HealthSense
356 Galston Rd,
Galston NSW
Tel: 02 9653 1104

Hornsby Heights Pharmacy
Shop 2/110 Galston Rd,
Hornsby Heights NSW
Tel: 02 9987 4777

InHarmony Skin & Beauty Clinic
Level 1, shop 11, 68-72 The Entrance Rd,
The Entrance NSW 2261
Tel: 02 4334 1155

Understanding skin function, skin healing, and bruising process

The skin is made up of three layers:

1. Epidermis: The outermost layer of the skin that protects the body from the environment. The thickness of the epidermis varies in different types of skin. On the eyelids, the epidermis is 0.5 mm thick, and 1.5mm thick on the palms and soles of the feet. The epidermis contains the melanocytes (the cells in which melanoma develops), the Langerhans’ cells (involved in the immune system in the skin), Merkel cells and sensory nerves. The epidermis regenerates itself approximately every 28 days; all cells are turned over as the most superficial cells are replaced by new ones.

2. Dermis: It is located beneath the epidermis and is the thickest of the three layers of the skin (1.5 to 4 mm thick), making up approximately 90% of the thickness of the skin. The main functions are to regulate temperature and to supply the epidermis with nutrient-saturated blood. Much of the body’s water supply is stored within the dermis. This layer contains most of the skins’ specialised cells and structures, including blood vessels, lymph vessels, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, nerve endings, and collagen and elastin.

3. Hypodermis: The innermost layer of the skin that consists of a network of fat and collagen cells. It functions as both an insulator, conserving the body’s heat, and as a shock-absorber, protecting the inner organs. The blood vessels, nerves, lymph vessels and hair follicles also cross through this layer.

Wound healing is the process by which the skin, or any injured organ, repairs itself after injury. The main aim of wound healing is to prevent or limit further damage, to clean and seal the wound against infection, to restore tissue strength, and if possible, tissue function.

The wound healing process is characterised by four overlapping phases:

1) An initial response to maintain normal skin function (homeostasis)

2) An inflammatory response to prevent infection

3) A proliferative phase to reconstitute the wound site

4) A remodelling phase where tissue strength and function are restored

A bruise shows up when an injury makes small blood vessels bleed under your skin. Your skin isn’t broken, so blood doesn’t have anywhere to go. It pools and forms clots and changes the colour of the skin above the injury.

Types of bruises include:

Contusions: Bigger bruises caused by harder blows to the skin

Ecchymosis: A flat, purple bruise that happens when blood leaks into the top layers of your skin

Haematoma: Lump under your skin formed by clotted blood. The area is usually swollen, raised, or painful. It is not the same thing as a haemorrhage which is a heavy bleeding inside or outside your body.

Bruise colour arises from the formation and accumulation of haemosiderin and biliverdin beneath the skin after bleeding. Bruises resolve as the body reabsorbs the blood. A fresh bruise, which can be tender to touch, appears as blue to reddish purple in colour due to the breakdown of haemoglobin and subsequent storage of released iron in haemosiderin. As healing progresses, the resolving bruise changes colour to yellow as a result of enzymes degrading biliverdin to bilirubin and fading until the bruise completely disappears.

Why do I bruise so easily?

  • Getting older: As you age, your skin gets thinner and loses the protective layer of fat that acts as a cushion when you bump into something. Also, your blood vessels get more fragile.
  • Some medicines and supplements: Aspirin or a blood thinner can cause occasional black-blue mark. Some supplements, like fish oil and ginkgo, can do the same.
  • Steroids like prednisone can also cause easy bruising because they thin the skin
  • Low vitamin C: If you don’t get enough nutrients, you may bruise easily.
  • Family history
  • Sun damage: Over time, the sun slowly weakens your skin and the tiny blood vessels underneath it.
  • Blood disorders usually cause symptoms other than bruising
  • Intensive exercise: You’re pushing your muscles with so much effort that it leads to tiny tears in your blood vessels.
  • Heavy drinking associated with cirrhosis
  • Some types of cancer such as leukaemia
Skin function

The skin is made up of three layers:

1. Epidermis: The outermost layer of the skin that protects the body from the environment. The thickness of the epidermis varies in different types of skin. On the eyelids, the epidermis is 0.5 mm thick, and 1.5mm thick on the palms and soles of the feet. The epidermis contains the melanocytes (the cells in which melanoma develops), the Langerhans’ cells (involved in the immune system in the skin), Merkel cells and sensory nerves. The epidermis regenerates itself approximately every 28 days; all cells are turned over as the most superficial cells are replaced by new ones.

2. Dermis: It is located beneath the epidermis and is the thickest of the three layers of the skin (1.5 to 4 mm thick), making up approximately 90% of the thickness of the skin. The main functions are to regulate temperature and to supply the epidermis with nutrient-saturated blood. Much of the body’s water supply is stored within the dermis. This layer contains most of the skins’ specialised cells and structures, including blood vessels, lymph vessels, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, nerve endings, and collagen and elastin.

3. Hypodermis: The innermost layer of the skin that consists of a network of fat and collagen cells. It functions as both an insulator, conserving the body’s heat, and as a shock-absorber, protecting the inner organs. The blood vessels, nerves, lymph vessels and hair follicles also cross through this layer.

Skin healing

Wound healing is the process by which the skin, or any injured organ, repairs itself after injury. The main aim of wound healing is to prevent or limit further damage, to clean and seal the wound against infection, to restore tissue strength, and if possible, tissue function.

The wound healing process is characterised by four overlapping phases:

1) An initial response to maintain normal skin function (homeostasis)

2) An inflammatory response to prevent infection

3) A proliferative phase to reconstitute the wound site

4) A remodelling phase where tissue strength and function are restored

Bruising process

A bruise shows up when an injury makes small blood vessels bleed under your skin. Your skin isn’t broken, so blood doesn’t have anywhere to go. It pools and forms clots and changes the colour of the skin above the injury.

Types of bruises include:

Contusions: Bigger bruises caused by harder blows to the skin

Ecchymosis: A flat, purple bruise that happens when blood leaks into the top layers of your skin

Haematoma: Lump under your skin formed by clotted blood. The area is usually swollen, raised, or painful. It is not the same thing as a haemorrhage which is a heavy bleeding inside or outside your body.

Bruise colour arises from the formation and accumulation of haemosiderin and biliverdin beneath the skin after bleeding. Bruises resolve as the body reabsorbs the blood. A fresh bruise, which can be tender to touch, appears as blue to reddish purple in colour due to the breakdown of haemoglobin and subsequent storage of released iron in haemosiderin. As healing progresses, the resolving bruise changes colour to yellow as a result of enzymes degrading biliverdin to bilirubin and fading until the bruise completely disappears.

Why do I bruise so easily?

  • Getting older: As you age, your skin gets thinner and loses the protective layer of fat that acts as a cushion when you bump into something. Also, your blood vessels get more fragile.
  • Some medicines and supplements: Aspirin or a blood thinner can cause occasional black-blue mark. Some supplements, like fish oil and ginkgo, can do the same.
  • Steroids like prednisone can also cause easy bruising because they thin the skin
  • Low vitamin C: If you don’t get enough nutrients, you may bruise easily.
  • Family history
  • Sun damage: Over time, the sun slowly weakens your skin and the tiny blood vessels underneath it.
  • Blood disorders usually cause symptoms other than bruising
  • Intensive exercise: You’re pushing your muscles with so much effort that it leads to tiny tears in your blood vessels.
  • Heavy drinking associated with cirrhosis
  • Some types of cancer such as leukaemia

Healthcare Professionals

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Bruise-eze® 2.B

(Practitioner Only)

5 x 5mL STERILE single-use applicators

Best for:

  • Haematomas
  • Postoperative ecchymosis
  • Post blepharoplasty
  • Post –sclerotherapy hemosiderinic dyschromias
  • Prevention of iron-dependent venous ulcers
  • Varicose ulcers
  • Pressure sores
  • Fissures, burns
  • Scarring of wounds
  • Post-laser therapy (epilation, ablative & non-ablative)

Indicated for topical therapy of all dermoepidermal tissue’s trophic-dyschromic alterations.

Lactoferrin

Lactoferrin (Lf) is an endogenous natural iron-binding chelant. It is found in most body fluids such as saliva, tears, nasal secretions and intestinal fluids, as well as in neutrophils. Lf is synthesised by the mucosal lining and neutrophils, and it is released in response to inflammatory stimuli.

Lf is a multifunctional protein with different activities: anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, antibiofilm and immunomodulatory.

Applications:

Post blepharoplasty

Martínez Grau, G., López, M, Martínez, A., & Gómez, M.C. Use of liposomal lactoferrin in post-blepharoplasty hematoma. Poster session at unknown conference and date.

Dyschromia

Musso, A., Aloesio, R., & Caponi, R. (2015). Use of topical preparation based on lactoferrin in acute and chronic management of skin dyschromias and hypotropisms. Acta Vulnologica, 13(2), 77-89.

Ulcers

Brizzio, E., Castro, M., Narbaitz, M., Borda, N., Carbia, C., Correa, L., Mengarelli, R., Merelli, A., Brizzio, V., Sosa, M., Biancardi, B., & Lazarowski, A. (2012). Vein and Lymphatics, 1:e6.

References:

Siqueiros-Cendón, T., Arévalo-Gallegos, S., Iglesias-Figueroa, B.F., García-Montoya, I.A., Salazar-Martíez, J., & Rascón-Cruz, Q. (2014). Immunomodulatory effects of lactoferrin. Acta Pharmacologica Sinica, 35(5), 557-66. doi: 10.1038/aps.2013.200.

Kell, D.B., Heyden, E.L., & Pretorius, E. (2020). The Biology of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein that can help defend against viruses and bacteria. Hypothesis and Theory, 11(1221), 1-15. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2020.01221.

Healthcare Professionals Brochure

Have any questions? Feel free to contact us.

Unit 8, 917-923 Old Northern Rd, Dural NSW 2158 Australia

PO Box 3481, Dural NSW 2158

Toll Free Phone: 1300 032 810

Toll Free Fax: 1300 032 812

Telephone: + 61 2 8049 9798

Fax: + 61 2 8049 9777

Email: info@concepthealth.com.au